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A Distance Education Update with Goodlett Mcdaniel March 23, 2010

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I had the opportunity to speak with our new Associate Provost for Distance Education, Goodlett McDaniel in late March of 2010. Knowing University Life’s interest in the distance effort at Mason and in helping him meet his SACS and CAS goals for delivering student services to distance learners, Goodlett was good enough to offer a brief update, one of a series of updates that you will find periodically posted to this blog. You will see in the associated video on this page that Goodlett refers to a peculiarly serendipitous alignment of factors that is catalyzing a significant growth in DE course production and attendance at Mason. The College of Science has an entire cluster of courses recently approved for development: astronomy, physics, two biology courses, and two math courses. Also new on the scene is an anatomy and physiology course being produced by Cyndi Beck from California. Cyndi is working with Ric Reo at Prince William to create an interesting distance production with distance delivery. In another cluster, Social Work, traditionally a very ground based discipline, has had such success with their 200 level courses they created that they are producing their masters courses for on line delivery.

George Mason University seems to be doubling the number of enrollments for distance courses each year, which is what recently has caught the eyes of SACS, having rightly perceived that our growth (substantive change in some programs) is significant enough to warrant recommending that Mason now build out the resource infrastructure that will support the growth of distance programs while guaranteeing all practical equanimity to students in Fairfax, Montana and beyond. Nationally, distance education is growing at 17 to 20 percent annually. Goodlett notes that if Mason growth, as predicted, matches the national pace, we will be at capacity given the resources we have now and at the ready line, and will be positioned for a new build out of resource infrastructure: more instructional designers, distance education delivery technologies, faculty trained and prepared practically and pedagogically, and a new level of communicating with and serving students at-any-distance.

In the mean time, in anticipation of the SACS presence at Mason over the coming summer, Goodlett spends the early part of his days discovering and developing the policies and procedures that need to be standardized to drive this growth process and designing the ways in which they support a quality product and meet accreditation standards. He notes that we can figure out how to measure the variety of outcomes assigned to distance courses and compare them to ground based courses, but while Mason is rolling with a rapidly growing portfolio of pilot distance courses and programs, we have allow ourselves to get our “foot caught in the bicycle wheel”, so we don’t miss opportunities for evaluation and assessment .

The roles that University Life will play in the coming months and years in Mason’s distance efforts are emerging and taking shape as conversations focus on the most recent language in the SACS and CAS guidelines. We are sure to play critical parts as we insure that our services to distance students continue to evolve as Mason meets this new and important challenge and we reach out to touch the students we serve through ever vaster reaches of time and space. We’re going global, and we like that!

Distance Education at Mason with Goodlett McDaniel from GMULife Tech. Integration on Vimeo.

from Lois Tetrick of CCT: a conference of interest to some March 22, 2010

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Each spring Georgetown University’s Interdisciplinary Program in Cognitive Science has staged an event designed to engage many people across the DC area in the issues of cognitive science. This year we are holding a workshop on Cognitive Science and Morality, taking up a lot of interesting recent work on a biological component to the moral capacity that humans have.

The workshop will be held on Monday, April 12 and promises to be a great event with new dimensions. We hope to see many of you there, along with your students. I am attaching the program and a flyer. Please circulate this announcement to all who may be interested.

All the best
David


David W. Lightfoot, PhD
Professor of Linguistics,
Director, Interdisciplinary Program in Cognitive Science,
Director, Communication, Culture & Technology Program,
Georgetown University,
3520 Prospect St NW #311,
Washington, DC 20057.
Tel 202-687-4804, fax 202-687-1720

a conference of interest to some:) March 22, 2010

Posted by michaelgalvin in : Uncategorized , add a comment

Each spring Georgetown University’s Interdisciplinary Program in Cognitive Science has staged an event designed to engage many people across the DC area in the issues of cognitive science. This year we are holding a workshop on Cognitive Science and Morality, taking up a lot of interesting recent work on a biological component to the moral capacity that humans have.

The workshop will be held on Monday, April 12 and promises to be a great event with new dimensions. We hope to see many of you there, along with your students. I am attaching the program and a flyer. Please circulate this announcement to all who may be interested.

All the best
David


David W. Lightfoot, PhD
Professor of Linguistics,
Director, Interdisciplinary Program in Cognitive Science,
Director, Communication, Culture & Technology Program,
Georgetown University,
3520 Prospect St NW #311,
Washington, DC 20057.
Tel 202-687-4804, fax 202-687-1720

Great Free Professional Development Opportunities from Classroom2.0 March 9, 2010

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many of these conversations focus on teaching and learning, (which many of you are interested it!) and often there are webinars that are right where we live:) I’ll keep tracking and highlight those that I think might be of particular interest to University Life.
Tuesday, March 9th
2pm US PST / 10pm GMT/UTC (intl): “Social Bookmarking: Can You Digg It? Web Applications for Research.” Rochelle Rodrigo hosts.
http://www.learncentral.org/event/52298


4pm US PST / 12am (next day) GMT/UTC (intl): “Emerging Technology in Education.” Host Kevin Murphy leads a panel on renewable energy tech in education.
http://www.learncentral.org/event/53104


5pm US PST / 1am (next day) GMT/UTC (intl): “Digital Storytelling” with Bernard R. Robin. The first in a series of MERLOT Classic Award Winning presentations.
http://www.learncentral.org/event/60483


Wednesday, March 10th
12:30pm US PST / 8:30pm GMT/UTC (intl): Eric Biederbeck hosts: “Animoto and Glogster.” Part of the MSP2 series.
http://www.learncentral.org/event/51985

1pm US PST / 9pm GMT/UTC (intl): Marian Heddesheimer presents “eT@alking Tuesdays: 3D-Teaching and Learning in Second Life.” Part of The Australia Series.
http://www.learncentral.org/event/61556

5pm US PST / 1am GMT/UTC (intl): I interview Jim Gemmell and Gordon Bell on their fascinating new book, Total Recall: How the E-Memory Revolution Will Change Everything. http://www.learncentral.org/event/60484

6pm US PST / 2am GMT/UTC (intl): Bud Hunt introduces the ISTE 2010 Leadership Bootcamp in a session on how your own personal learning network can be amplified, customized, and maximized.
http://sites.google.com/site/leadershipbootcamp/pre-conference-events

Thursday, March 11th
2pm US PST / 10pm GMT/UTC (intl): Jane Krauss and Suzie Boss host “Better with Practice: PBL Implementation Tips from the Field Session 3.”
http://www.learncentral.org/event/50931

3pm US PST / 11pm GMT/UTC (intl): Jo Hart hosts “Edublogs Fine Focus – Elluminate White(board) Magic!” as part of The Australia Series.
http://www.learncentral.org/event/59862

5pm US PST / 1am (next day) GMT/UTC (intl): (Repeat) Jane Krauss and Suzie Boss host “Better with Practice: PBL Implementation Tips from the Field Session 3.”
http://www.learncentral.org/event/51457

5pm US PST / 1am (next day) GMT/UTC (intl): I interview Sharon Peters on “Teachers Without Borders” and international online collaborative projects.
http://www.learncentral.org/event/60485

6pm US PST / 1am (next day) GMT/UTC (intl): Mayte Esponda presents on “Global Collaborative Student Projects: How to Create an Effective Collaborative Project to Interact Online with Schools Worldwide.”
http://www.learncentral.org/event/60851


Saturday, March 13th
9am US PST / 5pm GMT/UTC (intl): The Classroom 2.0 LIVE! show. “Engaging Students with Interactive Technology” with special guest Adora Svitak.
http://live.classroom20.com


9am US PST / 5pm GMT/UTC (intl): Jeff Applegate hosts “Choosing and Using Video Games in the Classroom: A Coach’s Role.”
http://www.learncentral.org/event/58440

10am US PST / 6pm GMT/UTC (intl): Maria Droujkova hosts “Math 2.0 Weekly.” This week, Mangahigh with Chris Green.
http://www.learncentral.org/event/61835

11am US PST / 8pm GMT/UTC (intl): Jeff Applegate hosts “Designing eGames: Prototyping Your Game.”
http://www.learncentral.org/event/61500

Tech Trends in Education for the Coming Year February 11, 2010

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Cloud computing, green technology…Scott Carlson, a Chronicle reporter, and Warren Arborgast, a technology consultant who works with colleges , talk about the challenges and opportunities. http://chronicle.com/article/Audio-Tech-Trends-for-the/64105/

NASA Astronaut Tweets From Space ? For Real This Time January 22, 2010

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Robin Wauters
TechCrunch.com
Friday, January 22, 2010; 4:12 AM
Astronauts aboard the ISS received a special software upgrade earlier this week, according to a NASA statement released moments ago: personal access to the Internet and the World Wide Web via the “ultimate wireless connection”.

This personal Web access, called the Crew Support LAN, takes advantage of existing communication links to and from the station and gives astronauts the ability to browse and use the Web. The system basically provides astronauts with direct private communications.

From the release:

During periods when the station is actively communicating with the ground using high-speed Ku-band communications, the crew will have remote access to the Internet via a ground computer. The crew will view the desktop of the ground computer using an onboard laptop and interact remotely with their keyboard touchpad.

Flight Engineer T.J. Creamer made first use of the new system Friday, when he posted the first unassisted update to his Twitter account from the space station.

Previous tweets from space had to be e-mailed to the ground where support personnel posted them to the astronauts’ Twitter accounts.

U. of Colorado Lab Helps Haiti Victims Tweet for Help By Mary Helen Miller January 22, 2010

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Shortly after last’s week’s earthquake in Haiti, a group of students working in a laboratory in Colorado unveiled a project that makes it easier for victims and volunteers tweet for help.

The lab, at the University of Colorado at Boulder’s Atlas Institute, produced a guideline for a “help specific” Twitter syntax that allows tweets requesting help to be easily processed by a computer program. The program organizes the messages by “hashtags,” as codewords used in Twitter are often called, that express need and location. Then the software can send the information to an organization providing relief.

The lab is working to educate people in Haiti and elsewhere about the conventions. Victims and volunteers could get help more quickly if they used the syntax to tweet, and volunteers anywhere can reformat tweets from Haiti and then forward them to others.

“We have this small army of volunteers out there translating tweets into this other format,” said Kate Starbird, a doctoral student who helped conceive of the project.

Ms. Starbird said that the project had been in the works for months and was not specifically designed for Haiti. When disaster struck there last week, the lab decided to unveil the project even though it had not been completed.

“We had to try,” Ms. Starbird said.

Ms. Starbird acknowledged that most Haitians would not have access to a cell phone or other device that could be used to tweet. But volunteers arriving in Haiti in the quake’s aftermath are likely to have such capabilities, she said.

Steve Hardigan, founder of Classroom 2.0: Educational Networking: The Important Role Web 2.0 Will Play in Educatio December 17, 2009

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This is a must read from a guy who is a move and shaker in higher ed tech use. http://tinyurl.com/HardiganWhitePaper

sharing an article about Harvard’s H1N1 iPhone application! October 27, 2009

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Harvard Medical School Launches Swine Flu iPhone App

Leena Rao
TechCrunch.com
Monday, October 26, 2009; 8:07 AM

As the threat of the swine flu (otherwise known as H1N1) pandemic become more serious and President Obama declares a national emergency over the rapidly spreading virus, Harvard Medical School is hoping to help educate people with its new iPhone app. The Swine Flu app, which is currently available on the app store, costs $1.99.

The Swine Flu Application includes videos, animations and text that allow you to learn the basics about swine flu, how to reduce the risk to you and your family, and how to prepare your business for the pandemic. The app also features real-time updates and news from Harvard Med School about H1N1.

To let users determine how close outbreaks are to their location, the app has a ?HealthMap” feature that lets you know about the state of the epidemic in your current location and other locations. For those uses who are feeling sick but unsure if it is attributed to H1N1, the app has an interactive symptom checker that helps you decide if your symptoms, or your child?s symptoms indicate swine flu, and when it is wise to contact your doctor. And the app includes hotlines and numbers to call (based on the user’s location) in case of an emergency or for more information about H1N1.

The app also includes a section devoted to helping businesses educate employees about the pandemic and includes guides on how to prepare a business to deal with the flu.

There are other apps that provide similar services, such as the Swine Flu Tracker by IntuApps, but none have the backing of one of the foremost medical institutions in the world. The Swine Flu App is part of Harvard Medical School’s greater mobile strategy, called HMS Mobile, which aims to deliver a series of iPhone Applications aimed at promoting public health. It’s not a bad idea, especially considering that Harvard is monetizing the app. It should be interesting to see if Harvard’s newest app takes off; perhaps we will start seeing more medical institutions looking to make a presence on the app store.

Virtual Worlds as Job search academies September 29, 2009

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Take a look at this pleasant machinema that takes the viewer on a tour of a virtual career services: http://slenz.wordpress.com/